Here is an odd problem that I cannot figure out. I am handy with electrical stuff, but this one has me stumped. My small kitchen appliances all work on a single circuit, with 5 outlets. One of those outlets has a 20Amp breaker built into it with a test and resent button (I never understood what the test button is for). I only have a toaster, a floor lamp and occasionally a coffee grinder plugged into the circuit. Suddenly, none of the outlets work. Nothing new, no new appliances, the whole circuit went dead. I noticed when I trigger the reset button, there is an immediate click and it goes out again. I have tripped and reset the main breaker on the circuit board in the garage, nothing. Power gets to the outlet, but it doesn't work and there is no electricity in any of the 5. I un plugged everything. Reset the breaker on the outlet. It clicked again immediately, still no electricity. I changed out the outlet, with a new one with breaker built in which I bought today at Home Depot. Same problem. I tested for electricity, the outlet with the built in breaker receives 120v electricity coming in, but it always seems to be shorted out and does not send it out. I assume that all of the 5 outlets are connected inline, so thinking that if I went one by one, I'd be able to find a short. I opened all of the boxes, checked everything and all looks clean, new, no problems. I completely disconnected the two outlets that are closest to the main one with thereset button and nothing.Help
It is precisely on those coldest days of the year when you most need and appreciate the convenience of opening and closing your garage door quickly. Sadly, that's exactly the kind of day when moisture and cold can conspire to make this difficult. Garage doors can and do freeze to the garage floor. Sometimes it is just a minor icy connection between the two that can be broken when you hit the opener button. If the door refuses to budge on the first attempt, though, resist the urge to keep banging on the automatic opener button. This is likely to cause a more serious problem with the garage door opener—including, but not limited to, stripped gears, broken springs, and a burned-out motor on the opener.
In this article, we’ll tell you the difference between a safe door and one that’s unsafe. We’ll also give you the helpful tips you’re not likely to find in the manufacturer’s instructions to correctly, and safely, install a new garage door with a torsion spring and do-it-yourself tensioning. Installing a new, double garage door yourself will save you several hundred dollars and should take eight to 12 hours if you’re fairly handy. You can do most of the new garage door installation project yourself, but you should recruit help for removing the old door.

Garage Door Opener

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